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Gallery Talk: Kaneji Domoto

Posted on by riddlek@berkeley.edu

The Environmental Design Archives would like to thank everyone who attended our first Gallery Talk of the 2019-2020 Academic year! We had an amazing turnout and are so pleased to have been able to share this wonderful collection with all of you. We would also like to thank our speakers: Gary Kawaguchi, The Domoto family, and Gail Dubrow.

The attendees were able to view the exhibition about the life and career of Kaneji Domoto that explores the complex story behind the only American Japanese architect and landscape architect at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian community, in Westchester County, New York in 1944. On display are original correspondence, photographs, and drawings from the Domoto Collection held by the EDA that explore what it meant to be a mid-century American Japanese architect and how Domoto’s life experience and Japanese heritage influenced his work­- illuminating the intersections between race, the designed environment, power, access, and ability.

Interspersed below are images from the exhibit and the panel discussion. The panel discussion began with Gary Kawaguchi, author of Living with Flowers: History of the California Flower Market. Gary spoke about the Domoto family in the context of Japanese American history and social life. 

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Living with Flowers: History of the California Flower Market.

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Advertisement for the Domoto Brothers Nursery

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Brochure from the 1939 World’s Fair.

Following Gary’s talk about the beginnings of the Domoto Brothers nursery and Kaneji’s early career, three of the Domoto children as well as Kan's nephew, Michael Tsukada, recollected on aspects of their father’s life and career by sharing personal stories and insights about their father.

 

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Katherine Domoto sharing family photos.

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The house the Domoto children grew up in at 16 Union in New Rochelle, NY.

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Kris Marubayashi speaking about her father’s involvement with the Japanese American community.

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Homemade Christmas card featuring the Domoto children, made by Kaneji Domoto.

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Letter of redress from the Domoto Collection - shown in the exhibit.

Our final speaker of the night was Gail Dubrow who drew on research for her new book, Japonisme Revisited, placing Kaneji Domoto’s story into the broader context of the lives, educational trajectories, and careers of other architects of Japanese ancestry in America.

 

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Gail Dubrow discussing the career of Kan Domoto outside of Frank Lloyd Wright.

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1939 World’s Fair invitation.

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UC Berkeley’s Botanical Garden, designed by Domoto, shows his matured design pre-Taliesin.

We hope you enjoyed the panel discussion and viewing the exhibition!

 

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Our wonderful audience.

The exhibit will be on view in the Environmental Design Library: Raymond Lifchez and Judith Stronach Exhibition Cases, 210 Wurster Hall until December 16.


Kenneth Cardwell Collection

Posted on by riddlek@berkeley.edu

The EDA is happy to announce that the Kenneth Cardwell Collection is processed and accessible to researchers!

A longtime resident of Berkeley, Kenneth H. Cardwell (1920 – 2010) was born in Los Angeles, California. He attended Occidental College for two years before transferring to UC Berkeley (UCB) in 1939 to study architecture. During World War II, Cardwell took a break in his studies and enlisted in the U.S. (Army) Air Force in the South Pacific from 1941-1945. After an honorable discharge, he returned to UC Berkeley and completed his BA in Architecture in 1947. He worked in the firms of Thomsen and Wilson of San Francisco; Michael Goodman, and Winfield Scott Wellington in Berkeley; Kolbeck, Cardwell & Christopherson in Oakland; and Hall, Goodhue, and Haisley. Early in his professional career, he also worked as a historical preservationist and reconstruction consultant with his wife, Mary (Sullivan) Cardwell, also a UCB graduate.

Early in the 1940s, Cardwell became friends with Bernard and Annie Maybeck, beginning his lifelong fascination and scholarly research on Maybeck. He worked alongside Maybeck to catalog the homes designed by Maybeck throughout Berkeley. Out of his research of and with Maybeck, Cardwell published Bernard Maybeck: Artisan, Architect, Artist in 1977, republished in 1996; a groundbreaking book that brought Maybeck’s name to the forefront of architectural history.

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Bernard Maybeck: Artisan, Architect, Artist | Kenneth Cardwell

In 1949 Cardwell began teaching at the University of California, Berkeley and retired as a full professor in 1982. He created and taught the University's first course in Historic Preservation, which integrated the cultural and literary heritage of the West with the development of its physical environment. While at Berkeley, Cardwell also began collecting many architectural records relating to Bay Area Architectural History, developing what would become the College of Environmental Design Archives. He collected the works of Bernard Maybeck, Julia Morgan, John Galen Howard, Willis Polk, and Charles Greene.

In 1976, Kenneth Cardwell joined the firm Hall, Goodhue, and Haisley where he worked as an architectural preservationist and in community conservation. At this firm, he used his knowledge of architectural styles, construction techniques, and biographical information of individual architects to most accurately report and restore northern Californian historical sites. Important projects he surveyed, restored, and consulted on during this time include the Historical American Buildings Survey on the U.S. Mint and Montgomery Block of San Francisco, the Sanchez Adobe building, the Cooper-Molera Adobe, the U.S. Customs House and U.S. Post Office, and South Hall at the University of California, Berkeley.

Upon retirement in 1982, he received the University of Berkeley Citation for Distinguished Teaching. Kenneth Cardwell was elected a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects. A civic-minded citizen, he served on Berkeley's Civic Art Commission and the Board of Adjustments.

Sources:

Kenneth Cardwell, Curriculum Vitae

Kenneth Cardwell Obituary, East Bay Times from Jan. 14 to Jan. 16, 2010

“In Memoriam,” by S. Tobriner 2011,

https://senate.universityofcalifornia.edu/_files/inmemoriam/html/kennethhcardwell.html

 

Take a look at a few samples of projects from the collection: 

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Doe Library Alterations | University of California, Berkeley

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Holmes Residence | Lafayette, CA

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Holmes Residence Elevations | Lafayette, CA

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Claremont Hotel Sports Club [pool] | Berkeley, CA

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Claremont Hotel Sports Club [pool] | Berkeley, CA


CalArchNet Spring Meeting

Posted on by riddlek@berkeley.edu

May 5-6 marked the sixth meeting of CalArchNet, held at the Environmental Design Archives (EDA), with representatives from eight institutions in attendance. Topics discussed included: ways for self-supporting institutions to generate revenue, digitization policies and fees, developing an institutional archive, born digital collections and how to preserve, and architectural theory reading lists/libguides.

The group traversed the winding hills behind the University to visit sites of architectural significance such as Havens House, Greenwood Commons, and Thorsen House.

The first stop was the Weston Havens House, designed in 1940 by architect Harwell Hamilton Harris for the philanthropist John Weston Havens Jr. The house is under the stewardship of the College of Environmental Design and is currently used for visiting CED professors.

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Tours of Havens House are led by a graduate student of the CED

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This map is painted on hidden doors that open and close to expose the kitchen behind them.

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Taking in the view of the bay.

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View of the entry bridge from outside.

Our next stop was a tour of the Greenwood Commons development which began in 1903 with the construction of a summerhouse by John Galen Howard for the prominent San Francisco attorney Warren Gregory and his wife Sadie. After World War II, the area became home to a growing number of professionals, particularly those associated with the University. For more information see our virtual collection.

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1 Greenwood Common, 1955 for clients Ann & Robert Birge. Architect: Donald Olsen.

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Former EDA curator, Waverly Lowell, was kind enough to speak to us about the history of the Commons.

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4 Greenwood Common, 1954 for client Ruth Duhring. Architect: Harwell Hamilton Harris, Landscape Architect: Geraldine Knight Scott.

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7 Greenwood Common, Architects: Rudolph Schindler, William Wurster, Henry Hill, Landscape Architect: Lawrence Halprin.

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Outside of 10 Greenwood Common.

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10 Greenwood Common, 1953 for clients Anna & Otto Maenchen. Architect: John Funk.

Final stop of the day was a tour of Thorsen House. The William Randolph Thorsen House was designed by the architects Henry Mather Greene and Charles Sumner Greene in style of the American Arts & Crafts in 1909. Since 1942, the Sigma Phi Society of California has owned the Thorsen House and has been entrusted with its care and preservation.

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Exterior view of the Thorsen House.

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Entrance for Thorsen House.

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Gorgeous recessed ceiling lights.

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Sigma Phi president, Zach, leading the tour.

If you’re an archivist, librarian, or curator working with architecture archives in California and would like to become involved with CalArchNet, you can join the Google group or email calarchnet@gmail.com for more information.


Gertrude Jekyll’s Surrey Gardens

Posted on by riddlek@berkeley.edu
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The Copse | Brook, Godalming Surrey England

The Environmental Design Archives at the University of California, Berkeley, is proud to announce the online publication of 931 high-resolution images of drawings, maps, plans, correspondence, notes, and ephemera from The Gertrude Jekyll Collection. These images document Gertrude Jekyll's gardens and landscapes in the county of Surrey in the United Kingdom.

The images are published on Calisphere, a gateway to more than one million digitized objects from libraries, archives, museums, and cultural institutions in the state of California.

View the images from the Jekyll Collection here: https://calisphere.org/collections/26864/

This digitization project was made possible by the generous support of the Surrey Gardens Trust, an educational charity dedicated to raising awareness of and protecting Surrey's heritage of historic parks, gardens and designed landscapes. The documents from the Gertrude Jekyll Collection were individually digitized and cataloged in-house at the Environmental Design Archives, one of the foremost collections of Architecture, Landscape architecture, Planning, and Design records in the United States.

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Merrow Croft | Guildford, Surrey England
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Garden Court | Guildford, Surrey England

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Munstead Grange | Godalming, Surrey England

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Wesleyan Church (Hughes Memorial) | Godalming, Surrey England

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Heatherside House | Camberley, Surrey England


Eldon Beck Collection

Posted on by riddlek@berkeley.edu

The EDA is happy to announce that the Eldon Beck Collection is processed and accessible to researchers!

Beck graduated from the University of California, Berkeley's Department of Landscape Architecture in 1953. Beck began his professional career with Eckbo, Royston, and Williams in 1956 and was offered the position of Associate with the new firm of Royston, Hanamoto, and Mayes in 1958 when the Eckbo firm took a new direction. In 1960, he became a partner in the firm eventually known as Royston, Hanamoto, Beck, and Abey (RHBA).

In September 1978, Beck was offered an appointment as Adjunct Professor of Landscape Architecture at UC Berkeley so he took a one year leave of absence from RHBA. Although he had no intention of pursuing professional work, at the same date in September 1978, he was asked to prepare the masterplan for a new village at Whistler, British Columbia. In September 1979, Beck left RHBA and established the firm of Eldon Beck, Landscape Architects with three employees, Steve Perkins, Renee Bradshaw, and Hope Rehlander, all graduates of the UC Berkeley Landscape Program. In 1985 additional major projects were offered and the corporation of Eldon Beck Associates was formed. Beck continued to teach at Berkeley until 1987.

The Eldon Beck Collection spans the years 1968-2014 (bulk 1990-2006), and includes files created by Beck while working for RHBA and for his own practice. The collection is organized into three series: Professional Papers, Office Records, and Project Records. The collection documents his career including his work at RHBA, his own landscape architectural practice, and teaching at the University of California, Berkeley. His career focused on designing landscapes for commercial and recreational spaces, of which many are well documented in this collection, including the Olympic Athletes Village in Whistler (2006-2010), Whistler Village and Town Center (1978-2010), Mont Tremblant Village (1991-2000), Snowmass Village (2001-2004), and Remarkables Park (1996-2005).

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The Base Village at Snowmass | Snowmass Village, Colorado

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The Base Village Concept Plan | Snowmass Village, Colorado

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Site Plan for Mont Tremblant Station | Mont Tremblant, Quebec, Canada

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The Vail Plan | Vail, Colorado

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Whistler Athletes Village Sketch | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Whistler Village Presentation Drawings | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Whistler Village Presentation Drawings | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

In the December 2018, I was fortunate to spend some time in Whistler, BC, Canada and see firsthand the ingenuity and design that Beck put into Whistler Village, the Olympic Legacy Village, and Plaza. Experiencing firsthand the environment that Beck created while simultaneously processing his collection was both educational and magical. Below are photographs taken during my visit.

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Whistler Blackcomb | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Whistler Blackcomb | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Blackcomb Gondola | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Views from the Gondola | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Views from the Gondola | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Views from the Gondola | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Views from the Gondola | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Views from the Gondola | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Whistler Village | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Village North | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Olympics Rings at Whistler Olympic Plaza | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada


ICAM19: Adventures in Copenhagen

Posted on by Christina Marino
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icam19 attendees

icam or the International Confederation of Architecture Museums, is an organization of architectural museums, centres, and collections, dedicated to fostering links between all those interested in promoting a better understanding of architecture. I was lucky enough to apply and receive a scholarship to attend their conference in September of 2019 in Copenhagen, hosted by the Danish Architecture Center in their new home designed by OMA call BLOX. Taking as its theme 'Migrating Ideas" the conference invited its participants to connect with their peers.

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BLOX designed by OMA and home of the Danish Architecture Center (DAC)

The Conference

Attending icam19 provided me with the opportunity to meet curators and archivists from all over the world giving me the chance to discuss acquisition policies, born-digital architectural records, fundraising strategies, exhibition ideas/approaches, and learn first-hand about Danish architecture and design. It was an incredible professional conference experience, that is incomparable.

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Presentation by my colleague Aliza Leventhal on Born-Digital Architectural Records and Collecting Respitories

The unique format of icam, enables you to get to know new colleagues over a relatively short period, which allowed me to develop and widen my professional network of consummate professionals from a variety of institutions: museums, centers, archives, collections, libraries, and educational institutions; connections that have already led to subject specialty knowledge exchange.

Sites visited

Aside from connecting with my peers during the formal conference, I was given the opportunity to visit sites and buildings that were incredible - here are some of the places I visited while in Denmark:

  • Firm Visit: Henning Larsen
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Dining at Henning Larson where we got to experience first hand the interworkings of an international firm practicing comprehensive integrated design and eat a delicious 5-course dinner prepared by their in-house chef. I sat across the table from a CED graduate who has worked with the firm for two years, small world!

  • Danish National Arts Library
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The head archivist giving us a tour of the national collection of architectural drawings.

  • Grundtvigs Kirke(Kaare Klint, 1940)
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  • Bagsværd Church (Jorn Utzon, 1976)
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  • Boat Tour (Past, Present, and Future of the Harbor)
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Once an airplane hanger - now condos

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Freetown Christiania in the foreground, Bjarke Ingels’s ski slope power plant behind

  • Skovshoved Petrol Station (Arne Jacobsen, 1938)
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  • Bellevue Theater (Arne Jacobsen, 1954)
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  • Henningsen Residence (Poul Henningsen, 1937)
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wallpaper 

  • Munkegårdsskolen (Arne Jacobsen, 1957)
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Louis Smaus- New Addition to the EDA!

Posted on by riddlek@berkeley.edu


In January of 2018, the EDA was delighted to receive a donation of the work of landscape architect Louis Smaus, who practiced in New York and the San Francisco Bay Area from the early 1910s until his retirement in the 1950s. Smaus attended horticultural school near Hamburg, Germany where he began his career working as a landscape gardener at Paul Hauber Baumschulen. Smaus emigrated to the U.S. at age nineteen and found work, with a large firm in New York, as a landscape gardener of private and commercial grounds.

 

In 1910, Smaus moved to California where he worked at Stanford University and had charge of the Lathrop grounds. Following this Smaus became an employee of A.B. Spreckels, sugar magnate, and maintained the Spreckels estate in Napa, CA. In the late teens he joined the MacRorie-McLaren Company in San Mateo, CA who worked with major clients such as Mrs. Henry Allen and Andrew Welch and provided a majority of the plants for the 1915 Panama Pacific International Exposition. Smaus went into business for himself as a Landscape Engineer in 1931, working on Milton Haas estate in Los Altos, the Lachman estate, among others, retiring in the early 1950s.

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The collection contains drawings and photographs from Smaus’s time working with the MacRorie-McLaren Company circa 1915-1922. See below from some examples of the projects during this time:

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Stanford Stadium | Palo Alto, California

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MacRorie-McLaren Nursery

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Cal Memorial Stadium | Berkeley, California

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Panama Pacific International Exposition, 1915


3rd ANNUAL FORM FOLLOWS COMPETITION WINNERS ANNOUNCED!

Posted on by Emily Vigor
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This year marks the 3rd annual form follows student seating element design competition. We were incredibly fortunate to have street furniture company mmcité 7 sponsor the competition, challenging CED students to design and build a seating element for the Wurster Hall courtyard inspired by collection materials in the Environmental Design Archives. Students drew inspiration for their designs from archival materials relating to The Sea Ranch, a breakthrough example of an environmentally sensitive design that continues to grow in influence and relevance to architects and the public at large.

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Students presenting their designs to judges on October 11, 2018

 

During our first round of judging on October 11, students presented their designs to a panel of judges including David Karásek (mmcité), Dana Buntrock (Professor of Architecture), Richard Hindle (Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning), Elizabeth Thorp (CED Fabrication Shop), and Alex Yarovoy (CED Alumnus). The judges selected five designs to move on to the second round. Selected students were provided with a single sheet of exterior plywood (4’ x 8’ x ¾” thick), finishing materials and $50 worth of steel to construct their seating element.

On November 8, the five completed seats were on display in the Wurster Gallery where faculty, students, and the general public were able to vote on the top three designs.

DESIGNS

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Design: Erik Granum. Photo credit: Jason Miller/CED Visual Resources Center

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Design: Honglin Li, Yafei Li. Photo credit: Jason Miller/CED Visual Resources Center

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Design: Dandan Liu. Photo credit: Jason Miller/CED Visual Resources Center

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Design: Zhiyao Shu, Hong Xiang Chen, Fang Xu.Photo credit: Jason Miller/CED Visual Resources Center

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Design: Mauricio Zamora. Photo credit: Jason Miller/CED Visual Resources Center

After today's round of voting, we are pleased to announce that the top designs are:

  1. Eric Granum

  2. Hong Xiang Chen, Fang Xu, ZhiyaoShu

  3. Dandan Lui

These students will receive a cash prize and may be considered by mmcité for future production! All of these designs, including the five full-scale seats, are on display in the Environmental Design Library through December 20.

This is an event that the Environmental Design Archives has truly enjoyed hosting. It is a wonderful opportunity for us to have students engage with primary resources and watch them create something truly unique. We look forward to continuing this competition in the future!


Chicago Architecture Biennial: A Californian survives actual winter (for 2 days)

Posted on by Emily Vigor

Braving single digit temperatures and frozen landscapes, I travelled to Chicago during the first weekend in January to visit the second annual Chicago Architecture Biennial. With the title, Make New History, the biennial took place from September 2017 to January 2018 and was curated by Artistic Directors Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee. The installations were housed in the Chicago Cultural Center and featured over 140 participants from 20 countries.  This year’s theme focused on architects and artists whose designs explore how architecture can make new histories, often through referencing the past. The artistic statement for the biennial’s theme succinctly states:

“Despite the seemingly smooth horizon of historical information in which we find ourselves, there is a great diversity in the ways and means with which architects approach and redefine the past: from increasingly visible practices of referencing and resampling in image making, to reassembly of as-found and original materials, to the site specific practices that engage with heritage in unexpected ways. These paths all foreground historical narratives, forms, and objects – yet, their reconstitution is utterly contemporary.”

The referral to history led to some truly unique installations. Marshall Brown’s The Architecture of Creative Miscegenation sought to address the fact that every architecture is “infected” with references from history. His collages of building typologies digitally stitched together offers a new architecture of synthesized parts.

Keith Krumwiede’s wallpaper, Visions of Another America, is based on The Monuments of Paris by Joseph Dufour. His work examines the 19th century's  fascination with recreating romantic landscapes and geographies in paintings and drawings for decorative display. In Krumwiede’s wallpaper, historically significant architecture such as the Louvre or Porte Saint-Denis are replaced with images of fictional developer homes that he first showed in Atlas of Another America,  which introduced the idea of a fictitious yet familiar suburb known as Freedomland.

So many designers examined ways to reference and reflect on the history of architecture in their work, yet Jorge Otero-Pailos’ The Ethics of Dust literally put this physical history on display. The Ethics of Dust is a series of casts that are the results from cleaning pollution from monuments around the world. Otero-Pailos applies liquid latex to monuments; once dried, he removes the latex and along with it years of pollution, dust, and debris. These casts are not only visually stunning, but also show the impact that humans have on our architecture and environment.

Sponsors of the Biennial included SC Johnson, who offered free bus tours of Frank Lloyd Wright’s design for the company’s global headquarters in Racine, Wisconsin. The aptly named “Wright Now” tour included the administration building, research tower, and the newly built Fortaleza Hall by Foster + Partners.

Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the campus continues to be regarded as an ideal of the modern workplace. Wright’s design included an emphasis on natural light and collective workspaces, while also using the unique building technique of laying Pyrex tubes on top of one another instead of glass windows. Apparently Wright was not a fan of the local landscape, and felt that the workers did not need to look at the view when they should be working. While it’s definitely an eye-catching design, it did have some pitfalls - scientists in the research tower complained that it was too bright for them to adequately do their work, and requested that sunglasses be provided. The 43 miles of tubes used were also not able to stand up to the local weather - leaks were a regular occurrence until new sealant was installed. Throughout the campus, Wright also utilized tapered columns of his own design called “dendriform” to allow in light while also minimizing the floor print they occupied. Our tour guide relayed a story about how the Wisconsin Industrial Commission did not believe that these columns, which are 90-inches at the base and 18.5 feet at the top, would be able to handle the weight of his building. Wright decided to test their load-bearing abilities in public, putting sandbags on top to prove the design’s strength. After 60 tons were loaded on top of one (when only 12 were needed to prove his point), he was given his building permit.

One of the most stunning aspects of the tour was the Administration Building’s Great Workroom. Spanning half an acre, this space supported the work of 200 employees. Wright designed every aspect of the building, from its architecture to the furniture, and emphasized an open and bright environment as a way promote efficiency and direct contact between workers. The space feels like a cathedral, and certainly would have been an awe-inspiring space to work in. 

Photography was not allowed inside buildings on the tour, but a recent Vox video emphasizes the significance of Wright’s design while also providing stunning visuals. Follow this link to watch.


Archives are Full of Surprises

Posted on by Christina Marino

By Waverly Lowell, Curator

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Figure 1: Portrait of willis Polk

A package for the Archives was dropped off in the Dean’s office last week.  On the outside was the note “letters from Willis Polk to his Aunt Daisy.”  Willis Polk, a prominent, if contentious, San Francisco architect died in 1924 and his successor firm left archives and furniture to UC Berkeley in 1934. [figure 1]

While working for the California Historical Society in the early 1980s I preserved five Willis Polk clipping scrapbooks and learned that he had a younger sister Daisy. The last volume had a number of clippings about her and the rest of the clippings were torn out.  I always wondered what had happened to Daisy. So I knew that Daisy was not his aunt, but his sister and eagerly opened the package.

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Figure 2: A Young willis polk

Inside were postcards from Aunt Daisy, photographs of Willis Polk, Daisy de Buyer, and their father W.W. Polk, photographs of Willis Polk’s projects, and a copy of Architecture News (Jan 1891). Willis Polk (1867-1924) [fig 2] was born in Jacksonville, IL, to carpenter Willis Webb Polk. He had two siblings, Daniel and Daisy (1874-1963) [fig 3]. Polk entered into partnership with his father and brother opening the San Francisco office of Polk & Polk (1892-1894). Neither Willis nor Daisy had children, so it was likely that Alice had been Dan’s child.  I called the person who donated the material and asked him how he came to have it. He explained that his mother had purchased a house in Fresno and found this envelope in the attic. He took it home when he cleared out her house following her death as he found these historical artifacts interesting.  After a few years he decided the material belonged in an archives, found that EDA had a Willis Polk collection, and dropped it off. 

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Figure 3: A young Daisy Polk

The story of Daisy’s life would make a great movie.  She was trapped in Europe at the outbreak of WWI [figure 4] and became active in French relief efforts including working with future president Herbert Hoover on Belgian Relief.  [fig 5 daisy] After the war, Mrs. W. H. Crocker of San Francisco used her personal funds to rebuild the village of Vitrimont which had been nearly destroyed and put Daisy in charge of the project. [fig 6 -postcard]. While at Vitrimont, Daisy's car broke down and General de Buyer, who lived nearby at Nancy, happened to be passing and lent assistance. From this chance meeting, “romance bloomed” and the couple married the following year. [fig 7- crocker telegram] For her relief and rebuilding work, Daisy was awarded the Medaille de la Reconnaissance Francaise (Silver) in September of 1919, and the following year was created a Chevalier in the Order of the Legion of Honor. She was known as Un Ami de France. Following her husband’ death after only two years of marriage, Countess Daisy de Buyer relocated to Paris which became her principal residence.  She wintered in Paris, travelled, and spent her summers in the family chateau in Nancy. She is buried in in her husband's family cemetery at Besancon.

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Figure 4: Telegram, 1916

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Figure 5: Daisy during WWI

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Figure 6: postcard

Daniel Polk had a daughter Alice (1907-1960) who remained close to her aunt Daisy. [fig 8 March 1957] One of the news articles reports that Daisy gave her niece a trunk of family photographs and papers! Sadly, Alice Polk Kegley was killed in a car accident after which her husband Charles (Carl) Smith Kegley (1897–1979) moved to Fresno. This is one example of how historical treasures can arrive at the archives through a roundabout route and added to existing collections at the Environmental Design Archives.

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Figure 7: telegram, 1927

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Figure 8: clipping

 

For more information please see https://archives.ced.berkeley.edu/collections/polk-willis