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Willa Cloys Carmack Collection Update

Posted on by riddlek@berkeley.edu

Last year the EDA received an additional donation of materials from the family of Willa Cloys Carmack. We are excited to announce that this material will begin to be processed in January 2020 and will be available to researchers by the end of the spring semester! These materials, which include correspondence, photographs, plant lists, reference files, and travel paraphernalia, will greatly enhance the collection and provide greater insight into the career of Willa Cloys Carmack.

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Willa Cloys Carmack with her husband and children

Willa Clair Cloys Carmack (1889-1968) was one of the first women to graduate with a degree in Landscape Architecture from UC Berkeley, which at that time was part of the Department of Agriculture under the direction of Professor John Gregg. After graduating with her degree in 1916, she is listed in the Berkeley City Directory, in 1917, as a Landscape Architect.

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Oakland Tribune | November 14, 1921

Willa Cloys was an only child, born November 1, 1889, in the Midwest. Her father, Edward H. Cloys was a building contractor and the family moved to California around the late nineteen-teens. By 1925, Willa married Robert M. Carmack, and based on the 1930 census they had two children, John and Sarah. [i]  Throughout her career, which spanned more than thirty years, she secured several large estate commissions in and around Hillsborough, schools in San Leandro, the San Jose Women's Club, city parks in Petaluma, and a subdivision called Felton Gables in Menlo Park, among others. During the Depression, Cloys taught landscape design at the California School of Gardening, a school started by and for women in Hayward in 1926 and lectured at California garden clubs. She was also a founding member of the California Horticultural Society.

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Excerpt from the publication The Architect and the Engineer, April 1928

Some of her notable projects include Villa Delizia garden, the garden for the Lachman Estate, and the San Jose Women’s Club. Her collection is of great importance, as she was an early proponent of the use of native plants in California gardens and an active part of a network of women working to influence how we garden in California today.

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Villa Delizia – Estate of Garfield D. Merner | Hillsborough, CA

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Residence of Mrs. John Hood | Berkeley, CA

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Residence of Gustave Lachman| Hillsborough, CA

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Residence of Gustave Lachman| Hillsborough, CA

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San Jose Women's Club Dedication | September 2017

[i] Biography of Willa Cloys Carmack by April Halberstadt, May 2007


Walter Hood Collection Currently Being Processed

Posted on by Emily Vigor

Processing is currently underway for the Walter Hood Collection through funding provided by a National Endowment for the Humanities: Collections and Reference Resources Grant. Over the last few months, I’ve been doing an initial inventory of the legacy media (CDs, DVDs, and Zip disks) in the collection to prepare it for imaging (a process where the files on these items are captured in a way that makes them easier to preserve for the long term). Processing the files captured from these legacy media items will happen in 2020. Meanwhile, my focus for the remainder of 2019 has been to preserve and process the analog materials in Hood’s collection, which are primarily comprised of files, drawings, and photographs relating to his numerous projects. Processing these materials has been an important way to better understand Hood’s approach to design, particularly when looking at his thoughtful engagements with the communities he’s designing for. Hood utilizes meetings and worksheets to gather feedback from the people who live in the regions his designs are situated in, and these are well documented for many of his projects in the EDA’s holdings. This attentive approach can also be seen in numerous sketchbooks in his collection. The sketchbooks are a treasure trove of images and notes by Hood, from his early days as a student at CED, to travel throughout the Bay Area and beyond, to his initial visits to a region he’s thinking of designing for. I’ve found these sketchbooks to be a useful window into Hood’s design process!

Scroll below to see images from the sketchbooks. The Walter Hood Collection will be available to researchers in early 2021!

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Visiting Usonia

Posted on by Christina Marino

Blog by Curator Emeritus Waverly Lowell

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Image 1: Lurie House

October seemed to be Domoto month. A wonderful exhibit in the Lifchez cases in the Library and a great program with family, scholars, and friends honoring the life and work of architect/landscape architect Kaneji Domoto.[i]  Being on the East Coast at the time, I couldn’t attend the program but was lucky enough to visit two Domoto Houses in Usonia, a neighborhood in Pleasantville New York. My host Lynnette Widder, lives in Domoto’s  Lurie House, [image 1], curated a 2017 exhibit on the Usonian Houses [ii]at the Center for Architecture, and is working on a monograph about Domoto’s work. Lynette was busy with the ongoing restoration of the house and preparing to give a tour to the New York chapter of Docomomo the following day, but graciously showed us around.

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Image 2: Site plan based on Wright's design

Usonia, 35 miles north of New York City, was founded in 1944, as a unique demonstration of Frank Lloyd Wright’s vision of a designed community. Wright created the site plan [image 2] and designed a few of the homes, the rest were designed by a number of Taliesin Fellows. Kaneji Domoto studied at Taliesin prior to being interned during World War II, then opened his own practice in 1948.[iii] His five Usonian houses demonstrate his integration of Wrights ideas, Japanese aesthetics, the natural environment, and affordability. 

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Image 3: Lurie House Front Entrance

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Image 4: Lurie House, Note from Kaneji Domoto on inside of broom closet

The 1949 Lurie House is the most compact of Domoto’s five Usonian homes. [image 3] Comprised of a single-level rectangular plan covered by a shed roof and surrounded by what is now a mature woodland, a surprising amount of light passes below the tree canopy entering the house through south facing windows in the living room and a number of strategic skylights.  Responding to his client’s requirements, the kitchen counters were built low for the petit Mrs. Lurie (impossible with current codes) and a bi-fold wall constructed between the daughters’ bedrooms should they wish to share the space, which according to Widder, was never opened. [image 4] The house was constructed primarily of solid cypress for the exterior and plywood veneer for the interiors. The living room was anchored by a large stone fireplace and separated from the kitchen by a suspended cabinet. [images 5 & 6]

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Image 5: Lurie House, Hearth

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Image 6: Lurie House, Transparent hanging cabinet between living/dining room and kitchen

The owners of the Bier house then welcomed us dropping by for a look in. [image 7] Also designed in 1949, this is the largest of the five Domoto Usonian homes. Large and airy, the cantilevered living room is open on all four sides either to the interior or the woods and floats above the surrounding meadow. [image 8] This house too has skylights and the sectioned windows originally had areas of colored glass glazing. A stone fireplace separates it from the slightly raised kitchen and other public rooms. [images 9 & 10]Domoto was also responsible for the landscaping that included wrapping a pre-existing tree with a dining terrace to preserve the shade it provided.

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Image 7: Model of Bier house showing cantilevered living room

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Figure 8: Bier House Livingroom, Windows reflect Wright-style sections and Japanese aesthetics

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Image 9: Bier House, Fireplace looking up to kitchen and out to private room wing

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Image 10: Bier House, Skylight over stairs kitchen to living room 

[i] https://archives.ced.berkeley.edu/events/Domoto-Exhibiton

[ii] F.L. Wright’s Usonian houses were smaller and more affordable than his sprawling Prairie style residences, containing little ornamentation, and lacking basements or attics. Also, a concept or manifesto about housing and living that Wright began crafting in the 1930s

[iii] Widder, Lynette. Five Usonian Homes: Kaneji Domoto. Pleasantville, NY: Center for Architecture, 2017.


Aaron Green Update

Posted on by riddlek@berkeley.edu

EDA Digital and Collections Archivist, Emily Vigor, and Reference Archivist, Katie Riddle are teaming up to process the Aaron G. Green Collection. The collection contains correspondence, photographs, project records, and a wide-ranging assortment of drawings that document Green’s extensive career. 

Born in Corinth, Mississippi in 1914, Green studied architecture at Cooper Union in New York City where he learned about the work of Frank Lloyd Wright. Green was invited by Wright to join Taliesin as an apprentice in the early 1940s. His architectural career was interrupted by WWII, during which he served as a bombardier in the Pacific theaters. After the war, he moved to Los Angeles to work with industrial designer Raymond Loewy, before relocating north to San Francisco where he founded Aaron G. Green Associates in the early 1950s, a practice dedicated to service-oriented design.

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Aaron G. Green - Jolly rogers Crew| Netherlands East Indies 1945

 

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Aaron G. Green | Taliesin West, 1941

During this time, Green acted as Wright’s West Coast representative, including seeing through the completion of the Marin County Civic Center after Wright's death. During his career, Green designed residential, commercial, industrial, municipal, judicial, religious, mass housing, and educational projects. Some of his well-known projects include The American Hebrew Academy (1999), The Marin Civic Center in San Rafael (1960-1966), Aaron Green Residence at Nine Oaks (1954), St. Elizabeth Seton (1987-2000) and both mausoleum and chapel additions to the Chapel of the Chimes Memorial Park in Oakland, CA (1955-1997).

 

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Aaron G. Green Residence at Nine Oaks | Los Altos, CA

This collection contains 200 cartons of manuscript and photographic material as well as over 700 tubes of rolled drawings. Emily and Katie are jointly working on processing the manuscript materials before tackling the drawings. During this process, they are re-housing the collection into acid-free folders and containers to preserve the materials. Once the processing is completed, they will finalize a project index, file list, and finding aid which will be available online to researchers. Look below for a sneak peek at some of the amazing projects in this collection:

 

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St. Elizabeth Seton | Pleasanton, CA

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Sculpture of St. Elizabeth Seton by Heloise Crista | Pleasanton, CA

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County of Marin, Civic Center | San Rafael, CA

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Chapel of the Chimes | Oakland, CA

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Chapel of the Chimes | Oakland, CA

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American Hebrew Academy | Greensboro, NC

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American Hebrew Academy | Greensboro, NC


Gallery Talk: Kaneji Domoto

Posted on by riddlek@berkeley.edu

The Environmental Design Archives would like to thank everyone who attended our first Gallery Talk of the 2019-2020 Academic year! We had an amazing turnout and are so pleased to have been able to share this wonderful collection with all of you. We would also like to thank our speakers: Gary Kawaguchi, The Domoto family, and Gail Dubrow.

The attendees were able to view the exhibition about the life and career of Kaneji Domoto that explores the complex story behind the only American Japanese architect and landscape architect at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian community, in Westchester County, New York in 1944. On display are original correspondence, photographs, and drawings from the Domoto Collection held by the EDA that explore what it meant to be a mid-century American Japanese architect and how Domoto’s life experience and Japanese heritage influenced his work­- illuminating the intersections between race, the designed environment, power, access, and ability.

Interspersed below are images from the exhibit and the panel discussion. The panel discussion began with Gary Kawaguchi, author of Living with Flowers: History of the California Flower Market. Gary spoke about the Domoto family in the context of Japanese American history and social life. 

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Living with Flowers: History of the California Flower Market.

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Advertisement for the Domoto Brothers Nursery

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Brochure from the 1939 World’s Fair.

Following Gary’s talk about the beginnings of the Domoto Brothers nursery and Kaneji’s early career, three of the Domoto children as well as Kan's nephew, Michael Tsukada, recollected on aspects of their father’s life and career by sharing personal stories and insights about their father.

 

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Katherine Domoto sharing family photos.

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The house the Domoto children grew up in at 16 Union in New Rochelle, NY.

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Kris Marubayashi speaking about her father’s involvement with the Japanese American community.

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Homemade Christmas card featuring the Domoto children, made by Kaneji Domoto.

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Letter of redress from the Domoto Collection - shown in the exhibit.

Our final speaker of the night was Gail Dubrow who drew on research for her new book, Japonisme Revisited, placing Kaneji Domoto’s story into the broader context of the lives, educational trajectories, and careers of other architects of Japanese ancestry in America.

 

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Gail Dubrow discussing the career of Kan Domoto outside of Frank Lloyd Wright.

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1939 World’s Fair invitation.

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UC Berkeley’s Botanical Garden, designed by Domoto, shows his matured design pre-Taliesin.

We hope you enjoyed the panel discussion and viewing the exhibition!

 

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Our wonderful audience.

The exhibit will be on view in the Environmental Design Library: Raymond Lifchez and Judith Stronach Exhibition Cases, 210 Wurster Hall until December 16.


Kenneth Cardwell Collection

Posted on by riddlek@berkeley.edu

The EDA is happy to announce that the Kenneth Cardwell Collection is processed and accessible to researchers!

A longtime resident of Berkeley, Kenneth H. Cardwell (1920 – 2010) was born in Los Angeles, California. He attended Occidental College for two years before transferring to UC Berkeley (UCB) in 1939 to study architecture. During World War II, Cardwell took a break in his studies and enlisted in the U.S. (Army) Air Force in the South Pacific from 1941-1945. After an honorable discharge, he returned to UC Berkeley and completed his BA in Architecture in 1947. He worked in the firms of Thomsen and Wilson of San Francisco; Michael Goodman, and Winfield Scott Wellington in Berkeley; Kolbeck, Cardwell & Christopherson in Oakland; and Hall, Goodhue, and Haisley. Early in his professional career, he also worked as a historical preservationist and reconstruction consultant with his wife, Mary (Sullivan) Cardwell, also a UCB graduate.

Early in the 1940s, Cardwell became friends with Bernard and Annie Maybeck, beginning his lifelong fascination and scholarly research on Maybeck. He worked alongside Maybeck to catalog the homes designed by Maybeck throughout Berkeley. Out of his research of and with Maybeck, Cardwell published Bernard Maybeck: Artisan, Architect, Artist in 1977, republished in 1996; a groundbreaking book that brought Maybeck’s name to the forefront of architectural history.

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Bernard Maybeck: Artisan, Architect, Artist | Kenneth Cardwell

In 1949 Cardwell began teaching at the University of California, Berkeley and retired as a full professor in 1982. He created and taught the University's first course in Historic Preservation, which integrated the cultural and literary heritage of the West with the development of its physical environment. While at Berkeley, Cardwell also began collecting many architectural records relating to Bay Area Architectural History, developing what would become the College of Environmental Design Archives. He collected the works of Bernard Maybeck, Julia Morgan, John Galen Howard, Willis Polk, and Charles Greene.

In 1976, Kenneth Cardwell joined the firm Hall, Goodhue, and Haisley where he worked as an architectural preservationist and in community conservation. At this firm, he used his knowledge of architectural styles, construction techniques, and biographical information of individual architects to most accurately report and restore northern Californian historical sites. Important projects he surveyed, restored, and consulted on during this time include the Historical American Buildings Survey on the U.S. Mint and Montgomery Block of San Francisco, the Sanchez Adobe building, the Cooper-Molera Adobe, the U.S. Customs House and U.S. Post Office, and South Hall at the University of California, Berkeley.

Upon retirement in 1982, he received the University of Berkeley Citation for Distinguished Teaching. Kenneth Cardwell was elected a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects. A civic-minded citizen, he served on Berkeley's Civic Art Commission and the Board of Adjustments.

Sources:

Kenneth Cardwell, Curriculum Vitae

Kenneth Cardwell Obituary, East Bay Times from Jan. 14 to Jan. 16, 2010

“In Memoriam,” by S. Tobriner 2011,

https://senate.universityofcalifornia.edu/_files/inmemoriam/html/kennethhcardwell.html

 

Take a look at a few samples of projects from the collection: 

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Doe Library Alterations | University of California, Berkeley

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Holmes Residence | Lafayette, CA

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Holmes Residence Elevations | Lafayette, CA

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Claremont Hotel Sports Club [pool] | Berkeley, CA

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Claremont Hotel Sports Club [pool] | Berkeley, CA


CalArchNet Spring Meeting

Posted on by riddlek@berkeley.edu

May 5-6 marked the sixth meeting of CalArchNet, held at the Environmental Design Archives (EDA), with representatives from eight institutions in attendance. Topics discussed included: ways for self-supporting institutions to generate revenue, digitization policies and fees, developing an institutional archive, born digital collections and how to preserve, and architectural theory reading lists/libguides.

The group traversed the winding hills behind the University to visit sites of architectural significance such as Havens House, Greenwood Commons, and Thorsen House.

The first stop was the Weston Havens House, designed in 1940 by architect Harwell Hamilton Harris for the philanthropist John Weston Havens Jr. The house is under the stewardship of the College of Environmental Design and is currently used for visiting CED professors.

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Tours of Havens House are led by a graduate student of the CED

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This map is painted on hidden doors that open and close to expose the kitchen behind them.

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Taking in the view of the bay.

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View of the entry bridge from outside.

Our next stop was a tour of the Greenwood Commons development which began in 1903 with the construction of a summerhouse by John Galen Howard for the prominent San Francisco attorney Warren Gregory and his wife Sadie. After World War II, the area became home to a growing number of professionals, particularly those associated with the University. For more information see our virtual collection.

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1 Greenwood Common, 1955 for clients Ann & Robert Birge. Architect: Donald Olsen.

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Former EDA curator, Waverly Lowell, was kind enough to speak to us about the history of the Commons.

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4 Greenwood Common, 1954 for client Ruth Duhring. Architect: Harwell Hamilton Harris, Landscape Architect: Geraldine Knight Scott.

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7 Greenwood Common, Architects: Rudolph Schindler, William Wurster, Henry Hill, Landscape Architect: Lawrence Halprin.

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Outside of 10 Greenwood Common.

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10 Greenwood Common, 1953 for clients Anna & Otto Maenchen. Architect: John Funk.

Final stop of the day was a tour of Thorsen House. The William Randolph Thorsen House was designed by the architects Henry Mather Greene and Charles Sumner Greene in style of the American Arts & Crafts in 1909. Since 1942, the Sigma Phi Society of California has owned the Thorsen House and has been entrusted with its care and preservation.

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Exterior view of the Thorsen House.

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Entrance for Thorsen House.

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Gorgeous recessed ceiling lights.

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Sigma Phi president, Zach, leading the tour.

If you’re an archivist, librarian, or curator working with architecture archives in California and would like to become involved with CalArchNet, you can join the Google group or email calarchnet@gmail.com for more information.


Gertrude Jekyll’s Surrey Gardens

Posted on by riddlek@berkeley.edu
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The Copse | Brook, Godalming Surrey England

The Environmental Design Archives at the University of California, Berkeley, is proud to announce the online publication of 931 high-resolution images of drawings, maps, plans, correspondence, notes, and ephemera from The Gertrude Jekyll Collection. These images document Gertrude Jekyll's gardens and landscapes in the county of Surrey in the United Kingdom.

The images are published on Calisphere, a gateway to more than one million digitized objects from libraries, archives, museums, and cultural institutions in the state of California.

View the images from the Jekyll Collection here: https://calisphere.org/collections/26864/

This digitization project was made possible by the generous support of the Surrey Gardens Trust, an educational charity dedicated to raising awareness of and protecting Surrey's heritage of historic parks, gardens and designed landscapes. The documents from the Gertrude Jekyll Collection were individually digitized and cataloged in-house at the Environmental Design Archives, one of the foremost collections of Architecture, Landscape architecture, Planning, and Design records in the United States.

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Merrow Croft | Guildford, Surrey England
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Garden Court | Guildford, Surrey England

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Munstead Grange | Godalming, Surrey England

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Wesleyan Church (Hughes Memorial) | Godalming, Surrey England

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Heatherside House | Camberley, Surrey England


Eldon Beck Collection

Posted on by riddlek@berkeley.edu

The EDA is happy to announce that the Eldon Beck Collection is processed and accessible to researchers!

Beck graduated from the University of California, Berkeley's Department of Landscape Architecture in 1953. Beck began his professional career with Eckbo, Royston, and Williams in 1956 and was offered the position of Associate with the new firm of Royston, Hanamoto, and Mayes in 1958 when the Eckbo firm took a new direction. In 1960, he became a partner in the firm eventually known as Royston, Hanamoto, Beck, and Abey (RHBA).

In September 1978, Beck was offered an appointment as Adjunct Professor of Landscape Architecture at UC Berkeley so he took a one year leave of absence from RHBA. Although he had no intention of pursuing professional work, at the same date in September 1978, he was asked to prepare the masterplan for a new village at Whistler, British Columbia. In September 1979, Beck left RHBA and established the firm of Eldon Beck, Landscape Architects with three employees, Steve Perkins, Renee Bradshaw, and Hope Rehlander, all graduates of the UC Berkeley Landscape Program. In 1985 additional major projects were offered and the corporation of Eldon Beck Associates was formed. Beck continued to teach at Berkeley until 1987.

The Eldon Beck Collection spans the years 1968-2014 (bulk 1990-2006), and includes files created by Beck while working for RHBA and for his own practice. The collection is organized into three series: Professional Papers, Office Records, and Project Records. The collection documents his career including his work at RHBA, his own landscape architectural practice, and teaching at the University of California, Berkeley. His career focused on designing landscapes for commercial and recreational spaces, of which many are well documented in this collection, including the Olympic Athletes Village in Whistler (2006-2010), Whistler Village and Town Center (1978-2010), Mont Tremblant Village (1991-2000), Snowmass Village (2001-2004), and Remarkables Park (1996-2005).

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The Base Village at Snowmass | Snowmass Village, Colorado

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The Base Village Concept Plan | Snowmass Village, Colorado

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Site Plan for Mont Tremblant Station | Mont Tremblant, Quebec, Canada

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The Vail Plan | Vail, Colorado

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Whistler Athletes Village Sketch | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Whistler Village Presentation Drawings | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Whistler Village Presentation Drawings | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

In the December 2018, I was fortunate to spend some time in Whistler, BC, Canada and see firsthand the ingenuity and design that Beck put into Whistler Village, the Olympic Legacy Village, and Plaza. Experiencing firsthand the environment that Beck created while simultaneously processing his collection was both educational and magical. Below are photographs taken during my visit.

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Whistler Blackcomb | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Whistler Blackcomb | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Blackcomb Gondola | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Views from the Gondola | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Views from the Gondola | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Views from the Gondola | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Views from the Gondola | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Views from the Gondola | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Whistler Village | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Village North | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

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Olympics Rings at Whistler Olympic Plaza | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada


ICAM19: Adventures in Copenhagen

Posted on by Christina Marino
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icam19 attendees

icam or the International Confederation of Architecture Museums, is an organization of architectural museums, centres, and collections, dedicated to fostering links between all those interested in promoting a better understanding of architecture. I was lucky enough to apply and receive a scholarship to attend their conference in September of 2019 in Copenhagen, hosted by the Danish Architecture Center in their new home designed by OMA call BLOX. Taking as its theme 'Migrating Ideas" the conference invited its participants to connect with their peers.

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BLOX designed by OMA and home of the Danish Architecture Center (DAC)

The Conference

Attending icam19 provided me with the opportunity to meet curators and archivists from all over the world giving me the chance to discuss acquisition policies, born-digital architectural records, fundraising strategies, exhibition ideas/approaches, and learn first-hand about Danish architecture and design. It was an incredible professional conference experience, that is incomparable.

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Presentation by my colleague Aliza Leventhal on Born-Digital Architectural Records and Collecting Respitories

The unique format of icam, enables you to get to know new colleagues over a relatively short period, which allowed me to develop and widen my professional network of consummate professionals from a variety of institutions: museums, centers, archives, collections, libraries, and educational institutions; connections that have already led to subject specialty knowledge exchange.

Sites visited

Aside from connecting with my peers during the formal conference, I was given the opportunity to visit sites and buildings that were incredible - here are some of the places I visited while in Denmark:

  • Firm Visit: Henning Larsen
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Dining at Henning Larson where we got to experience first hand the interworkings of an international firm practicing comprehensive integrated design and eat a delicious 5-course dinner prepared by their in-house chef. I sat across the table from a CED graduate who has worked with the firm for two years, small world!

  • Danish National Arts Library
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The head archivist giving us a tour of the national collection of architectural drawings.

  • Grundtvigs Kirke(Kaare Klint, 1940)
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  • Bagsværd Church (Jorn Utzon, 1976)
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  • Boat Tour (Past, Present, and Future of the Harbor)
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Once an airplane hanger - now condos

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Freetown Christiania in the foreground, Bjarke Ingels’s ski slope power plant behind

  • Skovshoved Petrol Station (Arne Jacobsen, 1938)
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  • Bellevue Theater (Arne Jacobsen, 1954)
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  • Henningsen Residence (Poul Henningsen, 1937)
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wallpaper 

  • Munkegårdsskolen (Arne Jacobsen, 1957)
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